Websites

Here are a handful of websites which have been key to my own & many others’ healing journeys:

Pete Walker

www.pete-walker.com

Pete Walker’s website was one of the first resources I ever came across which opened my eyes to complex trauma.

Pete is a licensed psychotherapist with a private practice in California. He’s written a few books and there is a lot of fantastic information about trauma on his website.

Pete’s ’13 steps for managing an emotional flashback’ are particularly life-changing and inspired our own emotional flashback cards.

Don’t forget to check out Pete’s excellent book Complex PTSD: From Surviving To Thriving, which we review here.

Dr. Nicola LePera

www.yourholisticpsychologist.com

Clinical psychologist Dr. Nicole, disillusioned with the conventional approaches for her own healing, promotes a way to heal yourself from trauma.

I came across Dr Nicole on my own healing journey and have found her content, and the online community around it, more useful than anything I have ever experienced with conventional therapy.

I am not alone – Dr Nicole, aka @the.holistic.psychologist on Instagram, has amassed over 1 million followers over the past year and it’s clear there is much need for a compassionate trauma-informed approach like this, in an easily accessible format.

Blue Knot Foundation

www.blue-knot.org.au

Blue Knot Foundation is an Australian trauma-informed charity to help survivors of childhood abuse.

Whilst much of Australia is not that far ahead of us here in the UK when it comes to implementing trauma-informed care & practice, this goes to show there is movement in the right direction.

If you’re in Australia, you can take advantage of Blue Knot’s very useful helpline. Otherwise there is a wealth of further information about all areas of trauma-informed care & practice, useful for both survivors and professionals.

See here, for example, for the Blue Knot Trauma-Informed Practice Guidelines.

Reddit /CPTSD

www.reddit.com/r/CPTSD

Have you heard of Reddit? This is a big online community with many different ‘subreddits’ where people can post about different niches.

And, yes, there is a Complex PTSD subreddit. This is one of the most positive, supportive and well-informed online communities I have come across in my journey.

I find it particularly useful when I feel like nobody understands – just reading through some of the other posts is enough to make you realise you’re not alone.

You can contribute as well, if you need a safe space to verbalise your experiences, and reach out to a supportive community.

Google Scholar

scholar.google.com

This is a great resource built by Google, allowing you to search a wide range of academic research papers across the world.

It’s an empowering platform to have access to, as you can begin to critically review complex trauma & mental health research for yourself.

An example is this search ‘borderline personality disorder complex PTSD’, returning lots of interesting research related to this.

Turn2Us

www.turn2us.org.uk

If you’re in the UK, the Turn2Us website is great for making sure you’re getting the state benefits you’re entitled to.

Anybody struggling with severe Complex PTSD should be able to access disability benefits, such as the non-means tested Personal Independence Payment (PIP). If you’re unable to work because of your trauma, you should also be entitled to benefits to help you with this.

A calculator like this will tell you what you could receive. If you’re based outside of the UK, have a look for a similar website relevant to your country.

Do you know of another great website we should mention here?
Please send us a message and let us know.